Education

intnav-logo-MCSBGraduate Program in Mathematical, Computational and Systems Biology (MCSB)

Our graduate program provides students from a variety of educational backgrounds and interests with Ph.D. training suitable for research careers in the nascent field of Systems Biology. The program emphasizes in-depth classroom study, interdisciplinary research rotations, and individualized advising.

The Center also supports many opportunities in education and training for undergraduates, postdoctoral scholars and community outreach.

Undergraduate Programs

Mathematical and Computational Biology for Undergraduates (MCBU)

MCBU logo

The Mathematical and Computational Biology for Undergraduates program provides interdisciplinary training and research opportunities for undergraduates in problems at the interface of mathematics, biology and computational science. MCBU has two main program components:
1)  undergraduate degree programs (major/minor) specializing in mathematics for biological sciences
2)  summer undergraduate research experiences in paired teams of mathematics and biology students co-advised by mathematics and biology faculty

 

Mathematics Major Specialization in "Mathematical Biology"

A specialization of the B.S. degree in Mathematics for students interested in interdisciplinary training in the biological and mathematical sciences with a goal of pursuing graudate studies and a career in systems biology. The specialization includes a three-quarter course sequence on mathematical modeling analysis and computation of biological phenomena, additional courses in mathematical and statistical methodology, as well as courses chosen from cell biology, genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology. Students also participate in the Undergraduate Biological and Mathematical (UBM) summer research program (funded through NSF UBM grant DMS-1129008).
 

Minor in Applied Mathematics for Students in Biological Sciences

A minor intended for Biological Sciences majors. Requirements for the Minor consist of Math 3A and 3D plus the six upper division quarter courses: Math 105A/B, 107 (on computational mathematics including the associated laboratories) and the three modeling courses for the MCBU Program. Students in this Minor should also be well prepared for the UBM supported summer research program as well as graduate studies in systems biology.

 


 

Systems Biology Undergraduate Track

This "track" is designed as a first step towards an interdisciplinary degree program appropriate for biology undergraduates with a curriculum that includes biology courses with an analytical and computational bent, in addition to methods courses on differential equations, linear algebra, statistics and computational mathematics. More advanced integrated courses include Bio 103 (Cell Biology), ICS 174 (Bioinformatics), BME120 (Sensory Motor Systems) and BME121 (Organ Transport Systems) and the MCBU modeling sequence described above. Systems Cell Biology (Dev Bio 232) and Systems Developmental Biology (Dev Bio 203C) and the three quarter Mathematical Biology sequence Math 227A,B,C, all designed for the MCSB Program, will also be available as advanced electives for students taking this track.

 


 

 

PRISM (Department of Mathematics)

 

PRISM logoThe goal of the PRISM program is to increase the numbers and preparedness of undergraduate majors and minors in science and mathematics through  a new undergraduate education and research program at UCI, called UCicamp (UCI Interdisciplinary Computational and Applied Mathematics Program). UCicamp plans to teach mathematics and computation through concrete problems arising from information processing to freshman and sophomore students during the regular school year. Selected number of students will go on to do supervised research in the summer months with full stipend support. UCicamp is aimed towards freshman and sophomore students to stimualte their interests in mathematics, computation and their applications in the digital age.

Graduate Program & Activities

 

Graduate Program in Mathematical, Computational and Systems Biology (MCSB)

intnav-logo-MCSBThe goal of UCI's program in Mathematical, Computational and Systems Biology (MCSB) is to provide students from a variety of educational backgrounds with Ph.D. training suitable for research careers in the nascent field of Systems Biology. The program emphasizes in-depth classroom study, interdisciplinary research rotations, and individualized advising.

Currently, the program begins with an initial "gateway" year, known as the Mathematical and Computational Biology (MCB) program, during which students receive basic training in principles of biology, as well as in mathematics, engineering and computer science. Students also participate in research rotations, workshops, and directed reading of the Systems Biology literature. Upon successful completion of the MCB year, students select a thesis advisor from among the participating faculty, who represent departments throughout the biological, physical and information sciences and engineering. Students fulfill the remainder of their degree requirements according to the guidelines of the departmental programs to which their thesis advisors belong, at the same time continuing to participate in workshops, retreats, journal clubs and other activities of the MCSB program. At some point in the near future, it is expected that MCSB students will also have the option of receiving an interdisciplinary degree independent from departmental program requirements.

 

For more information and to apply, visit the MCSB website and download the MCB Handbook  

Directors:
               MCSB Interdisciplinary Program Director: John Lowengrub, Department of Mathematics
Gateway Director: Jun Allard, Department of Mathematics
Associate Director: Arthur D. Lander, Department of Developmental & Cell Biology
Founding and Associate Director: Frederic Y.M. Wan, Department of Mathematics
 

 For inquiries regarding the MCSB Program:

Cely Dean, Asst. Administrative Analyst:
Tel. 949-824-4120

 

Karen Martin, Administrator,
Center for Complex Biological Systems:
Tel. 949-824-3377
E-mail: kymartin@uci.edu

 


 Systems Biology Journal Club

(for graduate students and postdocs)

 

When: Wednesdays, 12pm - 1pm
Where: 2120 Biological Sciences III
Course Code: 08512, Dev Bio 212 (Fall Quarter, 2018)
Advisor: Dr. Wenqi Wang

 

For further information and to find out how to join the group, please contact the instructor. Interested UCI Graduate Students are invited to enroll in the course Fall, Winter or Spring quarter, through the Webreg site.

 

SBJC Papers

SBJC Papers

 

Fall Quarter 2018

Week 2: "Extracellular Vesicles Provide a Means for Tissue Crosstalk during Exercise"

Week 3: "RNA velocity of single cells"

Spring Quarter 2018

Week 2 - 4/11/18 - https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25168

Week 3 - 4/18/18 - https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25193

Week 4 - 4/25/18 - RIP Talks

Week 5 - 5/2/18 - http://www.pnas.org/content/111/52/18507

Week 6 - 5/9/18 - https://www.nature.com/articles/nature26000

Week 7 - 5/16/18 - http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(18)30052-7

Week 8 - 5/23/18 - RIP Talks

Week 9 - 5/30/18 - http://www.cell.com/cell-systems/fulltext/S2405-4712(18)30053-X

Week 10 - 6/6/18 - http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(17)31142-X

Week 11 - 6/13/18 - http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(17)31319-3

 

Winter Quarter 2018

Week 2 - 01/24/18 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29153838

Week 3 - 01/26/18 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26700852

Week 4 - 02/02/18 - https://www.nature.com/articles/nmat3777

Week 5 - 02/09/18 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Engineered+Tissue+Folding+by+Mechanical+Compaction+of+the+Mesenchyme

Week 6 - 02/16/18 - https://www.nature.com/articles/s41551-017-0169-7

Week 7 - 02/23/18 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29186117

Week 8 - 03/02/18 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28874527

Week 9 - 03/09/18 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29293494

Week 10 - 03/16/18 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27764670

 

Fall Quarter 2017

Week 2 - 10/06/17 - http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(16)31660-9

Week 3 - 10/13/17 - http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(17)30185-X

Week 4 - 10/20/17 - http://www.nature.com/ncb/journal/v19/n5/full/ncb3507.html?foxtrotcallback=true

Week 5 - 10/30/17 - http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v19/n12/full/nn.4394.html

Week 6 - 11/3/17 -   http://www.cell.com/cell-systems/fulltext/S2405-4712(17)30090-X

Week 7 - 11/17/17 - https://www.nature.com/articles/s41540-017-0009-0

Week 8 - 12/1/17 -  http://msb.embopress.org/content/13/3/921

Week 9 - 12/8/17 -  https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11538-017-0294-1

 

Spring Quarter 2017

Week 1 - 04/14/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27870831

Week 2 - 04/21/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27870831

Week 3 - 04/28/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28171748/

Week 4 - 05/05/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28215526

Week 5 - 05/12/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27870831

Week 6 - 05/19/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27870831

Week 7 - 05/26/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27870831

Weeks 8 & 9 - 06/09/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27870831
                                     https://www.nature.com/ncb/journal/v15/n6/pdf/ncb2745.pdf                               

Winter Quarter 2017

Week 1 - 01/20/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27984723

Week 2 - 01/27/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27849584

Week 3 - 02/03/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27708057

Week 4 - 02/10/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26712315

Week 5 - 02/17/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25809250

Week 6 - 02/24/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27768887

Week 7 - 03/03/17 - https://elifesciences.org/content/5/e17056

Week 8 - 03/10/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27641957

Week 9 - 03/17/17 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27965290

 

Fall Quarter 2016

Week 1 - 09/30/16 - http://www.pnas.org/content/107/52/22534.full.pdf?sid=56a0bd47-3aaa-49f5-92cd-0a230696ed4b

Week 2 - 10/07/16 - http://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000739

Week 3 - 10/14/16 - http://rsif.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/13/121/20160475

Week 4 - 10/21/16 - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2008.06221.x/full

Week 5 - 10/28/16 - http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11538-014-0023-y

Week 6 - 11/04/16 - http://msb.embopress.org/content/4/1/161

Week 7 - 11/18/16 - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S002555641630147X

Week 8 - 12/02/16 - http://www.cell.com/cell-systems/pdf/S2405-4712%2816%2900005-3.pdf

Week 9 - 12/09/16 - http://www.pnas.org/content/107/2/565.full.pdf?sid=4c45655d-2a4d-405a-84b6-fdad515602d9

                            - http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/10/03/1608820113.full.pdf?sid=b23a4e57-fa41-476e-b5c5-ec4ede8c1ddd

 

Spring Quarter 2016

Week 1 - 04/04/16 - Research in Progress (RIP) Talk - "The Role of EMT regulators in governing mammary epithelial plasticity"

Week 2 - 04/11/16 - http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674%2815%2900204-4

Week 3 - 04/18/16 - http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674%2815%2901108-3

Week 4 - 04/25/16 - http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674%2815%2900246-9

Week 5 - 05/02/16 - Research in Progress (RIP) Talk - "Mathematical modeling link Wnt signaling to emergent patterns of metabolism in colon cancer"

Week 6 - 05/09/16 - http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v47/n11/full/ng.3414.html

Week 7 - 05/16/16 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26430121

Week 8 - 05/23/16 - http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674%2816%2930059-9#

Week 9 - 06/06/16 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26823433

 

Winter Quarter 2016

Week 1 - 01/15/16 - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1534580714006832

Week 2 - 01/22/16 - http://science.sciencemag.org/content/342/6155/1238016.full

Week 3 - 01/29/16 - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0896627315007643

                              http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982215014281

Week 4 - 02/05/16 - http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v525/n7568/pdf/nature14971.pdf

                              http://www.nature.com/ni/journal/v15/n2/pdf/ni.2789.pdf

Week 5 - 02/12/16 - http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v453/n7192/pdf/nature06879.pdf

Week 6 - 02/19/16 - http://msb.embopress.org/content/msb/4/1/195.full.pdf

Week 7 - 02/26/16 - http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v529/n7587/full/nature16961.html

Week 8 - 03/04/16 - http://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1001088

Week 9 - 03/11/16 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3478651/

                              http://genome.cshlp.org/content/25/12/1893.full

 

Fall Quarter 2015

Week 1 - 10/02/15 - http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v456/n7218/full/nature07331.html

                              http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v427/n6976/full/nature02298.html

Week 2 - 10/09/15 - http://www.sciencemag.org/content/336/6085/1157.full.pdf?sid=5c7ab86f-9c00-4b5c-86fe-d211af12d475

                      http://www.pnas.org/content/103/23/8697.full.pdf?sid=3dae189f-ebf0-4c9b-8717-41d525236e8a

Week 3 - 10/16/15 - http://www.pnas.org/content/107/36/15995.full.pdf?sid=72c7937c-77ea-4e48-a1a8-f9796c8da567

                              http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1046202313001643

Week 4 - 10/23/15 - http://www.sciencemag.org/content/327/5971/1389.full.pdf?sid=248e0b52-7a67-4c3e-82d3-ce5bd8750a86

                              http://www.esajournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1890/14-0417.1

Week 5 - 10/30/15 - http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v428/n6983/full/nature02424.html

                              http://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004152

Week 6 - 11/06/15 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4568459/pdf/srep13910.pdf

                              http://bioinformatics.oxfordjournals.org/content/25/12/i101.full

Week 7 - 11/13/15 - http://genesdev.cshlp.org/content/28/1/71.full.pdf

Week 8 - 11/20/15 - http://www.sciencemag.org/content/314/5804/1447.full.pdf?sid=c190bbcb-0ab4-4951-9f0f-d79e9de20b2b

                              http://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.1000149

Week 9 -12/04/15 -  http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v36/n2/pdf/ng1293.pdf

                              http://rsob.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royopenbio/3/3/120179.full.pdf

Week 10 - 12/11/15 - http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/v38/n8/pdf/ng1847.pdf

                                      http://epubs.siam.org/doi/pdf/10.1137/S0036139997330623

                               http://jb.oxfordjournals.org/content/157/3/121.full.pdf+html

 

Spring Quarter 2015

Week 1 - 04/10/15 - http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6226/1259038.abstract; http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v518/n7537/full/nature14128.html

Week 2 - 04/17/15 - http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v519/n7542/full/nature13996.html; http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v519/n7542/full/nature14279.html

Week 3 - 04/24/15 - http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v519/n7542/full/nature14024.html; http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v517/n7534/full/nature14045.html

Week 4 - 05/01/15 - http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6225/1010.abstract; http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6224/1257601.abstract

Week 5 - 05/08/15 - http://www.sciencemag.org/content/346/6216/1533.abstract; http://www.sciencemag.org/content/346/6215/1370.abstract

Week 6 - 05/15/15 - http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v519/n7543/full/nature14187.html; http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v518/n7538/full/nature14152.html

Week 7 - 05/22/15 - http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6228/1367.abstract; http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v519/n7544/full/nature14318.html

Week 8 - 05/29/15 - http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6229/1446.full; http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v518/n7537/full/nature14121.html; http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v518/n7537/full/nature14095.html

 

Winter Quarter 2015

Week 1 - 01/16/15 -http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v32/n7/full/nbt.2940.html; http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6217/78.full

Week 2 - 01/23/15 -http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(14)01497-4; http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v32/n12/full/nbt.3044.html

Week 3 - 01/30/15 -http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v32/n8/full/nbt.2939.html; http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v515/n7527/full/nature13985.html

Week 4 - 02/06/15 -http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867414015189; http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nbt.3062.html

Week 5 - 02/13/15 -http://www.sciencemag.org/content/347/6218/1254806.full; http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867414015177

Week 6 - 02/20/15 -http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v515/n7527/full/nature13992.html; http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v32/n9/full/nbt.2957.html

Week 7 - 02/27/15 - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867414014494; http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v32/n11/full/nbt.3027.html

Week 8 - 03/06/15 - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867414012264; http://www.cell.com/cell/abstract/S0092-8674(14)00471-1

 

Fall Quarter 2014

Week 1 - 10/10/14 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25214630; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25124443

Week 2 - 10/17/14 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043035; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25186725

Week 3 - 10/24/14 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24990743; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25146290

Week 4 - 10/31/14 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24522532; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25104393

Week 5 - 11/7/14 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24717442; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24598544

Week 6 - 11/14/14 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24948735; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24529478

Week 7 - 11/21/14 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24739965; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25171416

Week 8 - 12/5/14 - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25082703; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25079331

Fall Quarter 2012

 
 

Winter Quarter 2012

Fall Quarter 2011
 November 30th Paper
• November 16th Paper #1 / Paper #2
 November 9th Paper
 October 19th Paper #1 / Paper #2
 October 12th Paper #1 / Paper #2
 October 5th Paper #1/Paper #2

Spring Quarter 2011

Winter Quarter 2011
 January 12th Paper & Supplement
 
Fall Quarter 2010

Winter Quarter 2010

Fall Quarter 2009
• Week 2 Paper
 Week 3 Paper
 Week 4 Paper
 Week 5 Paper 
 Week 6 Paper 
(Holiday - Veteran's Day) 
 Week 8 Paper 
(Holiday - Thanksgiving) 
 Week 10 Paper 

Spring Quarter 2009

Fall Quarter 2008 
 Week 8 Paper
(Holiday - Thanksgiving)
• Week 10 Paper

Postdoctoral Scholars & Training

Center for Complex Biological Systems - Postdoctoral Scholars

 

CCBS LogoPostdoctoral Scholar positions are occasionally available throughout the year in the Center for Complex Biological Systems, at the University of California, Irvine. Initial appointment would be for a one-year period, with the possibility of extension, dependant in part on continuing extramural funding availability.

 

Current projects are focused on how biological systems in model organisms process spatial information during development, intracellular signaling, and cell proliferation. Other efforts within the Center include the development of computational and optical tools needed for measuring and modeling spatially dynamic systems, fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy methods.
 

 Please refer to the UCI Academic Employment website for current positions available within the Center, and other academic units at UC Irvine.

The University of California, Irvine is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer advancing inclusive excellence. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age, protected veteran status, or other protected categories covered by the UC nondiscrimination policy.


Employment Opportunities

Epigenomic Mechanisms of Memory Disruption by Early-life Seizures

September, 2018: A postdoctoral position is offered in a vibrant Neuroscience laboratory to probe the transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms initiated by early-life seizures that differentially program newborn and mature hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells and pyramidal neurons. These changes cause significant disruption of hippocampus-dependent memory processes associated with Epilepsy, with major clinical importance.
The NIH-funded project will employ innovative methodologies to examine, at single cell resolution, the role of specific transcription factors in functional and structural hippocampus-dependent memory processes associated with Epilepsy, with major clinical importance. The NIH-funded project will employ innovative methodologies to examine, at single cell resolution, the role of specific transcription factors in functional and structural hippocampal derangements that promote memory problems. . Single-cell RNA-seq, as well as ChIP-seq, and interventional approaches will be employed. Additional methods used in the lab include DREADD technology, live 2-photon imaging, as well as DTI imaging and behavioral testing.  (See: Patterson et al., J Neurosci, 2017;, McClelland et al., eLife 2014; Singh-Taylor et al., Molec Psych 2018; Bolton et al., Biol Psych 2018; Dube et al., Trends Neurosci, 2007).

The laboratory is located on the UC Irvine campus, a rich, diverse community of Molecular and Neuroscience research within Southern California.
Candidates should have a recent PhD degree and experience in Molecular Biology, and must be highly motivated. Experience in Bioinformatics and Neuroscience is desirable.

Please send a CV, a brief statement of research accomplishments and interests, and a list of references to baramlab@uci.edu.
Tallie Z. Baram, MD, PhD
D.D. Shepard Professor of Neurological Sciences
Prof. Pediatrics, Anatomy/ Neurobiology, Neurology
University of California-Irvine, CA, USA

 Open Postdoctoral Scholar Position - To Investigate the Polygenic Basis of Congenital Heart Defects

March, 2018 - The UC Irvine Center for Complex Biological Systems seeks a postdoctoral scholar to study the polygenic basis of congenital heart defects, and the transcriptional identity of heart stem/progenitor cells, in mouse models of mammalian heart development.  The position is fully funded and will be supervised by Professors Anne Calof and Arthur Lander.   Research will focus on how multiple small perturbations to gene expression collectively produce heart defects in multi-system birth defects disorders known as transcriptomopathies.

The successful applicant will have a Ph.D. in molecular and/or developmental biology, genetics, or genomics, and evidence of publication and/or preparation of high quality journal article(s). The applicant’s training should provide sufficient preparation to use mouse genetics, embryology, molecular biology, high resolution optical imaging (including optical projection tomography and MRI), together with genomics (RNA sequencing/bioinformatics), to identify morphogenetic abnormalities (progenitor cell proliferation, patterning and migration) and gene expression changes. Single-cell RNA sequencing of early embryos will also be used to identify transcriptional changes in individual progenitor cells.

The salary range for this position is negotiable and will be commensurate with training and experience; healthcare benefits are included.  Appointment will initially be for a one-year period with extension for up to 4 years, subject to performance.

Please send inquiries about this position to:

Anne L. Calof, Professor, CCBS (alcalof@uci.edu)

Arthur D. Lander, Professor and Director, CCBS (adlander@uci.edu)

The University of California, Irvine is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer advancing inclusive excellence. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age, protected veteran status, or other protected categories covered by the UC nondiscrimination policy.

 

 

Postdoctoral Scholar, Project Scientist and Specialist Positions 

      • Postdoctoral Scholar, Project Scientist and Specialist positions are occasionally available throughout the year in The Center for Complex Biological Systems, at the University of California, Irvine.
      • Initial appointment would be for a one-year period, with the possibility of extension, dependant in part on continuing extramural funding availability.
      • Current projects are focused on how biological systems in model organisms process spatial information during development, intracellular signaling, and cell proliferation. Other efforts within the Center include the development of computational and optical tools needed for measuring and modeling spatially dynamic systems and fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy methods.

Please refer to the UCI Academic Employment website for current positions available within the Center, and other academic units at UC Irvine.

 

 The University of California, Irvine is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer advancing inclusive excellence. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age, protected veteran status, or other protected categories covered by the UC nondiscrimination policy.

 
 
 

 

 

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